27 Conspiracy Theories That Turned Out To Be True

The internet is full of conspiracy theories. While some might sound like complete nonsense, others actually turned out to be true. Whether more conspiracy theories will turn out to be true in the future is up for debate. For now, get to know the ones that did.

The Dalai Lama works for the CIA

According to declassified intelligence documents, the Dalai Lama earned US$180,000 in connection with the CIA’s funding of the Tibetan Resistance in the 1960s. The aim was to disrupt China.

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Radio host and conspiracy theorist Alex Jones claimed that chemicals in water are turning frogs gay. While the chemicals won’t change a frog’s sexual orientation, a study shows that exposure to a certain pesticide can actually change frogs’ sex. Estrogen in suburban lakes can have the same effect.

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In the 1950s, the Canadian government developed the “fruit machine” to test for homosexuality in federal employees. The testing was done by exposing subjects to same-sex erotic images and analyzing pupil dilatation response. Many employees lost their jobs.

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The Advanced Aerospace Threat Identification Program investigated UFO sightings and other UFO-related events.

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There is actually a link between the supposedly secret organization that rules the world and the NSA, albeit just a hyperlink. Just type Illuminati backwards (Itanimulli) into a web browser, and it will take you to the NSA website.

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In 2005 it was revealed that the U.S. National Security Agency (NSA) had been intercepting phone calls and internet communications. Many companies and government agencies continue to do so today without your knowledge.

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Project Sunshine‘ tested radioactive strontium-90 on body parts of newly deceased children. This was done without the parents’ knowledge or consent.

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The CIA ran a fake vaccination program, and they had Bin Laden’s DNA on file thanks to his sister who lived in the U.S. A Pakistani doctor then identified his children’s DNA in the area where he was hiding, and this information led to his capture.

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In 1960 it was revealed that some of the cells used to make the polio vaccine could cause cancer. Between 1955 and 1963, nearly 100 million children were given this vaccine.

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A young girl, identified as Nayirah, falsely testified on Iraq’s invasion of Kuwait before the Congressional Human Rights Caucus in 1990. It turns out Nayirah was actually the daughter of the Kuwaiti ambassador to the U.S. and her testimony was part of a campaign called Citizens for a Free Kuwait, run by Hill & Knowlton, a PR firm.

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Studies funded by the National Confectioner’s Association and Coca-Cola made shocking claims, such as children who ate candy generally weighed less than those who didn’t. A paper published in JAMA Internal Medicine revealed that they had been padding the studies since the 1960s.

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Operation Northwoods was meant to commit acts of terrorism on U.S. soil to gain public support in the war against Cuba. Luckily then-President John F. Kennedy put a stop to the operation.

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Two future U.S. presidents, Ronald Reagan and Richard Nixon, are pictured with Harvey Hancock (standing) and others at Bohemian Grove in the summer of 1967. (Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.)

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Operation Popeye was a U.S. government weather modification program that used a technique called cloud seeding to increase precipitation over North Vietnam.

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Operation Mockingbird spied on members of the Washington press corps and paid journalists to publish CIA propaganda. It also funded student and cultural organizations and magazines.

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Project MKUltra was the name given to the CIA program that tested LSD on U.S. citizens without their knowledge. Unfortunately record have been destroyed.

The government added toxins to alcohol to stop people from drinking during prohibition in the 1920s. Around 10,000 people died as a result.

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According to the U.S. Naval Institute, the Gulf of Tonkin incident on August 2, 1964, was faked in order to gain American support for the Vietnam War.

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Operation Paperclip sent 1,600 Nazi scientists to work in the U.S. after World War II.

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In 1919, U.S. First Lady Edith Wilson began making decisions on behalf of President Woodrow Wilson after he suffered a stroke.

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The Atari video game ‘E.T., the Extra-Terrestrial’ was such a failure that the company buried unsold cartridges in a New Mexico landfill.

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A study found there was a link between brain damage and playing football.

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